Me Too movement's flaws have always been apparent: Critics

Me Too movement's flaws have always been apparent: Critics
 
 
With India's acclaimed filmmaker Anurag Kashyap now facing sexual assault allegations, the Me Too movement may just have made a comeback. Or, as some commentators are suggesting, we may now be witness to the flaws of the movement that is allegedly all about "settling scores with men". With the likes of Taapsee Pannu, a staunch feminist herself, changing her Me Too tune (from 'believe the female victim' in 2018 to 'Anurag Kashyap is the best feminist' now), politically incorrect questions are being raised. 
 
Here is what social media influencer Smita Barooah has to say. "I have always held that the Me Too movement was hijacked very early on, and often used to settle personal scores. Online trials and destroying men on hearsay is dangerous. Question is: Why are the most vocal “believe her” advocates now suddenly in the “diss her” and “believe him” mode?" she asked. 

Columnist Akshay Alladi chipped in saying, "Not commenting on any specific case, but the Me Too movement was always a deeply flawed one and an example of a moral panic, with no due process or institutional thinking. Very unintellectual, like many revolutionary movements, where moral zeal overtakes thinking." 
 
As a counter, one can argue that Me Too was largely a positive movement that helped many victims of torture to speak out. There were bad apples. Some defenders went overboard and thundered that whatever a woman says has to be taken at face value. Wouldn't it have helped matters had the discourse always been nuanced and didn't look at men as suspects by default?